MoTAS Weekly for 9/28/16: L’Shanah Tovah / Book Now for “History on Trial”

MoTAS Weekly NewsletterIn This Issue:

  1. L’SHANAH TOVAH FROM YOUR MOTAS LEADERSHIP
  2. OCTOBER MONTHLY MEETING (SUN 10/9): LESSONS FROM HISTORY ON TRIAL
  3. ALLAN SHERMAN CONCERT (SAT 10/29): TICKETING IS NOW OPEN
  4. SUKKAH CONSTRUCTION APPROACHES (SUN 10/16)
  5. OCTOBER DINING OUT: BBQ IN THE SUKKAH (MON 10/17)
  6. MOTAS DRESS SHIRTS: IS THERE INTEREST?
  7. IN CLOSING

1. L’SHANAH TOVAH FROM YOUR MOTAS LEADERSHIP

apple-honeyRosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, starts Sunday night. To all the men of Temple Ahavat Shalom:

L’Shana Tovah. Happy New Year 5777. May you be written and inscribed for a very happy, sweet, and healthy new year.

For those curious about Jewish customs at this time: There are a number of things you will see. The first is an abundance of sweet foods. Apples dipped in honey. Honey cakes. The sweet foods remind us of the sweet year to come. Apples in honey, specifically, express our hopes for a sweet and fruitful year. Apples were selected because in ancient times they became a symbol of the Jewish people in relationship to God. In Song of Songs, we read, “As the apple is rare and unique among the trees of the forest, so is my beloved [Israel] amongst the maidens [nations] of the world.” In medieval times, writes Patti Shosteck in A Lexicon of Jewish Cooking, apples were considered so special that individuals would use a sharp utensil or their nails to hand-carve their personal hopes and prayers into the apple skins before they were eaten. And the Zohar, a 13th-century Jewish mystical text, states that beauty – represented by God – “diffuses itself in the world as an apple.” With respect to the honey: honey – whether from dates, figs, or apiaries – was the most prevalent sweetener in the Jewish world and was the most available “sweet” for dipping purposes. And as for the biblical description of Israel as a land flowing with “milk and honey,” the Torah is alluding to a paste made from overripe dates, not honey from beehives. Still, enjoying honey at Rosh HaShanah reminds us of our historic connection with the Holy Land. Although the tradition is not in the Torah or Talmud, even as early as the 7th century, it was customary to wish someone, “Shana Tova Umetukah” (A Good and Sweet Year). (Source: Reform Judaism Website)

Another traditional food is a round challah. Some say they it represents a crown that reflects our coronating God as the Ruler of the world. Others suggest that the circular shape points to the cyclical nature of the year. The Hebrew word for year is “shana,” which comes from the Hebrew word “repeat.” Perhaps the circle illustrates how the years just go round and round. But Rosh Hashana challahs are not really circles; they are spirals… The word “shana” has a double meaning as well. In addition to “repeat,” it also means “change”. As the year goes go round and round, repeating the same seasons and holidays as the year before, we are presented with a choice: Do we want this shana (year) to be a repetition, or do we want to make a change (shinui)? Hopefully, each year we make choices for change that are positive, and each year we will climb higher and higher, creating a spiritual spiral. The shape of the Rosh Hashana challah reminds us that this is the time of year to make those decisions. This is the time to engage in the creative spiritual process that lifts us out of the repetitive cycle, and directs our energies toward a higher end. (Source: Aish Ha’Torah)

There are also apologies, for during the ten days starting Sunday evening, Jews examine their lives and see how they can do better. On Yom Kippur (starting the evening of October 11th), Jews apologize to G-d for their misdeeds during the past year. However, for an action against another person, one must apologize to that person. So in that spirit:

If any of the leaders of MoTAS have offended any of you, in any way, shape, manner, or form, real or imagined, then we apologize and beg forgiveness. If we have done anything to hurt, demean, or otherwise injure you, we apologize and beg forgiveness. If we have done or said over the past year that has upset, or otherwise bothered you, we sincerely apologize, and will do our best to ensure it won’t happen again. If you have done something in the above categories, don’t worry. We know it wasn’t intentional, and we would accept any apology you would make.

2. OCTOBER MONTHLY MEETING (SUN 10/9): LESSONS FROM HISTORY ON TRIAL

1610-denialIn less than two weeks, instead of our normal monthly meeting, in October MoTAS is facilitating an outing to see the new movie Denial, followed by a facilitated discussion. Denial is a very timely movie this election year, about a man who makes up what he believes to be the truth, backs it up with fabricated historical research, and then sues in court (for libel) anyone who claims he is lying. In this case, the man was David Irving, and the “truth” he was telling was that the Holocaust never happened. He sued, in British court, Dr. Deborah Lipstadt who had written a book about him showing how he was lying. We wouldn’t see that happen today, however — after all, we would catch on to anyone who was regularly lying about history.

The Movie:

  • Denial, a docudrama about the battle between Dr. Deborah Lipstadt and David Irving about his attempt to deny that the Holocaust ever happened. Based on the acclaimed book “Denial: Holocaust History on Trial”, DENIAL recounts Dr. Deborah Lipstadt’s (Academy Award® winner Rachel Weisz) legal battle for historical truth against David Irving (BAFTA nominee Timothy Spall), who accused her of libel when she declared him a Holocaust denier. In the English legal system, in cases of libel, the burden of proof is on the defendant, therefore it was up to Lipstadt and her legal team, led by Richard Rampton (Academy Award® nominee Tom Wilkinson), to prove the essential truth that the Holocaust occurred. You can see a trailer for the movie at YouTube.

The Plan:

  • 12:30pm … Meet at TAS for Announcements and background
  • 2:00 pm … Movie at AMC Promenade (1h50m +)
  • 4:30 pm … Reconvene at TAS for snacks and facilitated discussion

The Cost:

  • Group Tix+Discussion/Refreshments: $14.50 Adults, $11.00 Children
  • Discussion/Refreshments Only: $5
  • Plus $1 for Eventbee Registrations
  • Open to All TAS Members

How to RSVP:

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3. ALLAN SHERMAN CONCERT (SAT 10/29): TICKETING IS NOW OPEN

sherman-flyer-v2Before “Weird Al” Yankovic there was another “Al” – Allan Sherman – who became an instant celebrity in 1962 when he sang and recorded his devilishly clever parody lyrics on the album “My Son, The Folk Singer.” His zany songs hit just the right nerve with the American public and his first three Warner Bros. albums shot to Number One. Linden’s show is a tribute to the man and his music. MoTAS and TAS Sisterhood will be hosting a joint concert in tribute to Allan Sherman on Saturday, October 29, at 8pm (with a dessert reception to follow). Pricing is $25 for adults, $18 for children 18 and under, and sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information, including online ticketing, visit http://www.tasnorthridge-motas.org/activities/sherman/. You can also make reservations by emailing shermantickets@tasnorthridge-motas.org or by leaving a message at (641) 715-3900 Ext. 430235# .

This event is open to the general public. Please spread the word to all your friends who love Allan Sherman. It is sure to be a great night.

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4. SUKKAH CONSTRUCTION APPROACHES (SUN 10/16)

The approach of the High Holidays means it is nearly time to build a Sukkah. Mark your calendar for the Sunday October 16th, at a special early time — 8:00 AM. That morning, we’ll gather together under the watchful eye (and voice) of our Sukkah Foreman, Robert Levin, to build our Sukkah. Bring your hex wrenches, zip-ties, wire cutters, and most importantly, gloves, and come out and help. I find this one of the most fun activities of the MoTAS year—men working together to build something. Come join us for the fun.

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5. OCTOBER DINING OUT: BBQ IN THE SUKKAH (MON 10/17)

Rosie's BBQOur October dining out will be on the first day of Sukkot, so what better thing to do than to go get take-out BBQ from Rosies in Northridge, and bring it back to eat in your sukkah. Present a flyer when you pick it up, and MoTAS and the Caring Community will split 15% of your bill. Don’t have a sukkah, eat in the restaurant, and we’ll earn 20%. Rosie’s has moved from their location on Tampa to a new and improved location on Corbin, just N of Nordhoff St (i.e., N of the Target, not Lowe’s). There is more information, as well as a printable flyer (just click on the image) at http://www.tasnorthridge-motas.org/activities/dining. You will also find the flyer in the Temple foyer, in the October Menorah, and in the weekly eblasts.

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6. MOTAS DRESS SHIRTS: IS THERE INTEREST?

When MoTAS does something, we like to do it right. This includes dressing appropriate for Shabbat and events. To that end, we’re exploring purchasing white dress shirts embroidered with the MoTAS logo. These shirts could be worn at Shabbabaques, the MoTAS Shabbat, the Man of the Year dinner, and at any temple event we want to promote MoTAS while looking a bit more formal than a T-Shirt.

Pricing depends on how many we order, but we’re looking at anywhere between $20 and $30 a shirt. Here’s one example at around $20, and here’s another.

If you would be interested in ordering such a MoTAS dress shirt, please RSVP at http://tinyurl.com/motas-shirt-survey.

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IN CLOSING

As always, remember that the Men of Temple Ahavat Shalom is *your* organization. Keep up to date on our activities at http://www.tasnorthridge-motas.org/ and participate. Sign up for our action alert list at http://tinyurl.com/motas-action-alert. We want to serve all the men of Temple Ahavat Shalom and welcome new participants from the TAS membership. Join our Facebook group and “follow” our website. Come be part of the Men of Temple Ahavat Shalom!

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